CBX Racing

CBXs, new bikes, old bikes, cars, trucks, general chat, off topic, this is the place to post it.

Re: CBX Racing

Postby jerry smith » Sun Nov 25, 2018 9:12 am

I've been getting emulaters from Mikes XS .The Yamaha had 36mm forks, but when I saw them and how they work I just made the right size washer to fit the larger fork tubes on the Z1 I'm vintage racing and they work fine. Lot cheaper than Race Tech( I have Race Tech in the Rickman framed Z1 that I also race). I have a '79 CBX road bike I'll be putting them in this winter.
Good luck and have fun. Jerry
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby Warwick Biggs » Sun Dec 02, 2018 9:29 am

"It is what it is" - Colin Edwards commenting on his under developed Hypercycle at the Island Classic earlier in the year. He didn't do too badly tho' with a 7th overall on points bringing the North American team into 3rd place after the Poms. They should have done better if their bikes hadn't suffered catastrophic failures. These big air cooled superbikes start to self destruct as the power approaches 200hp and Colin had only had a few laps at Willow Springs on his hot rod prior to Philip Island. It had plenty of teething problems, as was to be expected.

Australian captain and World Superbike champion Troy Corser could have been given his marching orders after arguing with the umpire over his poor grid positions but when he was late to the dummy grid in qualifying he suffered the same penalty as everybody else. Australia ended up winning largely due to little known South Australian Historic Register member, V4 Norton test rider and fastest Oz at the IOM, Dave Johnson who was the classic dark horse on his XR69, out foxing (sorry about the mixed metaphor) Jeremy McWilliams and the strong English contingent to win the team prize and the Ken Wooten Trophy for top points scorer. I raced Dave the year b4 at a Historic meeting at Mac Park when he was on a very trick bevel Ducati. Still, not the fastest bike but he blitzed the field and very nearly lapped me. He's quick alright.

We are advised the US team will be returning for another tilt in 2019 but I am planning on sitting this one out and doing some coaching with Levi Day who is coming back to his home track, Mac Park from the off season in Europe and the Ducati TriOptions Cup. Unfortunately the dates clash and I need to work on quite a few things. Now that the CBX is running consistently (albeit with ground clearance issues still to be resolved b4 I wear the ends off the crankshaft - Georges, if you are reading this I need that new CrMo Martin frame sil vous plait).

It is much cheaper and more efficacious to work on improving the aged rider rather than pouring big bucks into the bike. You are never too old to learn some new tricks, they tell me!

Mac Park has been closed for the past month with major works to bring it up to FIM and World Superbike standards. Wider everywhere with much improved run off areas and spectator facilities. I will be taking the 400 out in a few weeks for a 2 day club session to be amongst the first to try the new track out. I've driven around and reckon there is only a second or two in it as the corners have been widened on the inside by pulling the apexes back with only a few already quick dog legs likely to be any faster. I do like the fast ones tho', especially on the CBX!
R.
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby Warwick Biggs » Sun Dec 02, 2018 9:48 am

Here is a pic of top dog at the 2018 Island Classic, Dave Johnson leading me out of the pits at the start of the 2017 Master of Mac Park.

I was still on skinny 18's and even so, whenever I see a Ducati on the grid I knew I couldn't come last but this guy had just done a 132mph lap at the TT on the Aprillia engined Norton and on this occasion he proved my assumption wrong.
R.
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby Rick Pope » Sun Dec 02, 2018 9:48 pm

Good stuff. I really enjoy reading these posts.
Rick Pope: ICOA Rally Director.
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby NobleHops » Mon Dec 03, 2018 2:33 am

What he said, thanks Rick!
I Do Vapor Blasting! http://www.cbxclub.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=9881

Nils Menten
Tucson, Arizona, USA '80 CBX, sort-of restored :-)

http://www.restocycle.com Ikon shocks for your CBX! https://www.ikonshocksusa.com/collections/honda/honda-cbx1000-79-80
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby FalldownPhil » Mon Dec 03, 2018 10:30 pm

Look what's getting ready for the Island Classic at P.I.
Right from the good ol USA. It's Hyper Cycle with Carry Andrews :-)
Best,
Phil
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby steve murdoch icoa #5322 » Tue Dec 04, 2018 8:37 am

Rick, just saying thanks again for all the stories about the circles you travel in and the people you know.

Seeing as you will be working with Levi Day it might be nice to hear a few tales about his time aboard the Roland Skate CBX from 2 years ago.
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby Warwick Biggs » Sun Dec 09, 2018 7:52 am

What is inside that fairing Phil? May I aver? The front axle looks way too big for 1982 and what are those big fat front forks off? Is this thing another 2018 special or a genuine historic bike?

Sorry to be pedantic but I would prefer to see more genuine historic racers rather than 200hp facsimiles. I see the number 69 on the fairing. Now who made that number famous? Quite a few questions looking for answers guys.
R.
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby steve murdoch icoa #5322 » Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:47 am

I think that #5 is the one that Colin Edwards rode in 2018.

Phil probably actually knows some of the cast but Nicky Hayden and HyperCycle were connected in the early days.
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby FalldownPhil » Tue Dec 11, 2018 11:42 pm

The guy in the blue jacket is Carry Andrew. He is Hyper-Cycle. Carry and his team helped Nicky with his early Suzuki racing days.
I don't know the details of the bikes but Carry tends to push them to their limits. Photo is from a recent test day at Willow Springs
International Raceway. There are quite a few old racers in the neighborhood.
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby Warwick Biggs » Thu Dec 13, 2018 2:51 am

Putting aside the issue of whether these hot rods are genuine historic bikes or not, Nicky Hayden's death was very strange. I've long maintained that pushbikes are dangerous, especially on our over crowded roads. Reports here suggested he was cleaned up by a car as he went through an intersection without looking or braking which seems odd for a professional athlete.

In Oz there is a new law that you have to give push bike riders at least 1.5 metres clearance when passing and this can have ridiculous consequences on roads without dedicated bike lanes. If you have 20 or 30 MAMILS (middle aged men in lycra) all pretending to be in the peleton at the Tour de France, they can be impossible to pass reducing traffic to their peddle speed.

Colin's Hypercycle bike was OK at the Island but it lacked development. Old bikes are harder to set up and race than modern superbikes and need more time to iron out the bugs and get them going quickly. That is another feather in the CBX's cap because it is competitive with a relatively low state of tune when set up properly. This is mainly due to the torquey motor, stable handling and good brakes.

I don't think Colin is returning for '19 so I wonder who will be on 'his' bike. Any clues Phil?
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby Syscrush » Thu Dec 13, 2018 10:56 am

Warwick Biggs wrote:Putting aside the issue of whether these hot rods are genuine historic bikes or not, Nicky Hayden's death was very strange. I've long maintained that pushbikes are dangerous, especially on our over crowded roads. Reports here suggested he was cleaned up by a car as he went through an intersection without looking or braking which seems odd for a professional athlete.

There's video of the crash, but I won't be watching it. From what I've read, it was a confluence of factors - the driver was only assigned 30% of the blame but was still sentenced to some time in prison for vehicular homicide. Apparently Nicky was wearing a helmet, but also had earbuds in.

For me it's in the same category as Schumacher's skiing accident. Terrible, and somehow ironic that these masters of speed went out doing something that regular schmoes do every day without incident. Reminders that life is fragile and precious.

Colin's Hypercycle bike was OK at the Island but it lacked development. Old bikes are harder to set up and race than modern superbikes and need more time to iron out the bugs and get them going quickly. That is another feather in the CBX's cap because it is competitive with a relatively low state of tune when set up properly. This is mainly due to the torquey motor, stable handling and good brakes.

Is the CBX considered torquey? Mine makes about 50-65 lbs-ft from 5000-10000 RPM. I would expect way more from a 4 cylinder bike, but I'm obviously no expert.
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby steve murdoch icoa #5322 » Thu Dec 13, 2018 4:44 pm

I have no idea when this small article was posted but it says a lot of the U.S. team will be on the hogged-out FJs.
Couldn't find another mention of it so i wonder if it is still happening.
https://mojoyamaha.com/
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby Warwick Biggs » Thu Dec 13, 2018 7:54 pm

That is very interesting. Thanks Steve. Altho' I won't be competing this year I hope the US team makes it. Phillip Island is not only a world class GP circuit but a beautiful place and then there are the penguins that nightly struggle up from the surf in the bay to their nesting burrows. Surfers can ride the waves with penguins, dolphins and seals and the racers have to look out for the locally common Cape Barren Goose. These are unusual, handsome birds with an imperious manner but larger than a Canada goose and as they graze on the meadows around the race track they can be a hazard. Some years ago Gary McCoy was nearly taken out by one at high speed.

On the subject of CBX torque, a tuned CBX is very different to the road bike. Mine is making 40% more across the range than a stock CBX. Most of that is from a mlld port job, oversize valves and CR carbs and a strong ignition system. But that is still down 50 hp on the top bikes. But where the CBX shines is its tractability. Those 4's are running 12:1 compression and high revs to get those numbers and so they are more like 2 strokes to ride. They have to be kept on the cam within a relatively narrow rev range. My CBX punches out of the turns from 6-8000rpm. Roly's bikes have a 1,000rpm more.

Were I a wealthy man I might go for a full 1300cc re-sleeve, hi compression pistons, a lightened and balanced competition crank, Carillo rods and light weight valve gear at a minimum cost of $30K and then I could match the hot rods. James Fisher in the UK is pursuing this path with his bike. But it doesn't stop there as I would have to constantly re-build my race motor. I'm not. I'm an ageing lifelong motorcyclist with only modest mechanical ability living on a fairly small pension. The CBX is not the easiest bike to race in Period 5 but it is probably one of the cheapest. My Period 6 NC30 is so much easier to race in every way but it is a generation younger and nowhere near as exciting as the big six.

It speaks volumes that my lightly tuned roadie is not entirely embarrassed to be on the same grid as the highly tuned specials needing only regular oil changes and conventional tuning rather than expensive re-builds after every outing.
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Re: CBX Racing

Postby Warwick Biggs » Thu Dec 13, 2018 7:54 pm

That is very interesting. Thanks Steve. Altho' I won't be competing this year I hope the US team makes it. Phillip Island is not only a world class GP circuit but a beautiful place and then there are the penguins that nightly struggle up from the surf in the bay to their nesting burrows. Surfers can ride the waves with penguins, dolphins and seals and the racers have to look out for the locally common Cape Barren Goose. These are unusual, handsome birds with an imperious manner but larger than a Canada goose and as they graze on the meadows around the race track they can be a hazard. Some years ago Gary McCoy was nearly taken out by one at high speed.

On the subject of CBX torque, a tuned CBX is very different to the road bike. Mine is making 40% more across the range than a stock CBX. Most of that is from a mlld port job, oversize valves and CR carbs and a strong ignition system. But that is still down 50 hp on the top bikes. But where the CBX shines is its tractability. Those 4's are running 12:1 compression and high revs to get those numbers and so they are more like 2 strokes to ride. They have to be kept on the cam within a relatively narrow rev range. My CBX punches out of the turns from 6-8000rpm. Roly's bikes have a 1,000rpm more.

Were I a wealthy man I might go for a full 1300cc re-sleeve, hi compression pistons, a lightened and balanced competition crank, Carillo rods and light weight valve gear at a minimum cost of $30K and then I could match the hot rods. James Fisher in the UK is pursuing this path with his bike. But it doesn't stop there as I would have to constantly re-build my race motor. I'm not. I'm an ageing lifelong motorcyclist with only modest mechanical ability living on a fairly small pension. The CBX is not the easiest bike to race in Period 5 but it is probably one of the cheapest. My Period 6 NC30 is so much easier to race in every way but it is a generation younger and nowhere near as exciting as the big six.

It speaks volumes that my lightly tuned roadie is not entirely embarrassed to be on the same grid as the highly tuned specials needing only regular oil changes and conventional tuning rather than expensive re-builds after every outing.
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