Tires for my `82

Postby Highmileage » Wed Mar 11, 2009 12:05 pm

Dunlops that are offered as original equipment are usually quite different than the ones that we are most likely to buy.

Note: I did not use the word 'any' in the above sentence.

I like the Dunlop Elite 3's that I have on my Suzuki GS 1000 GL. Although not inexpensive, they've lasted a really long time.

But for my '82 CBX (which is due for a change of rubber), I am about to order a set of the S-11's.
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Postby EMS » Wed Mar 11, 2009 1:41 pm

Highmileage wrote:Dunlops that are offered as original equipment are usually quite different than the ones that we are most likely to buy.

.


Why would that be :? Can you elaborate on this? Inquiring minds want to know. 8)
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Postby Terry » Wed Mar 11, 2009 2:06 pm

EMS wrote:
Highmileage wrote:Dunlops that are offered as original equipment are usually quite different than the ones that we are most likely to buy.

.


Why would that be :? Can you elaborate on this? Inquiring minds want to know. 8)


I think its pretty standard Mike for manufacturers to install 'standard' type OE tires for all vehicles that aren't performance related. A Ford Taurus will have less than spectacular rubber than say a Shelby Mustang. Same with motorcycles. Even the Hayabusa comes with Brickstone tires that everyone changes out ASAP because they don't stick very well or otherwise don't handle as well as other 'aftermarket' tires do. (Those) kind of tires are far cheaper for the manufacturers than high spec rubber. Same goes with shocks. Ever look at an OEM shock absorber compared to aftermarket shocks?
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Postby EMS » Wed Mar 11, 2009 2:26 pm

Well, I work in the automotive supplier industry and we are selling the same product to the OEM as we sell to the OEM- and independent aftermarket. I would think that this is common practice. I just can't see that a supplier would make two different quality products of the same part. Most OEMs are getting their OEM replacement parts through the same supply channels as their production parts.
For products like tires, brake pads, clutches etc, which are "wear parts", the aftermarket quantities are significantly higher than the OEM numbers which would make it not very economic to make a more expensive part than for the lower quantity OEM business.
As far as tires go, the only difference I can see is the age. All tires should actually sit a little after they are being made. If the just-in-time process gets them too quick on a vehicle and after that too quick on the road, the fresh rubber may wear prematurely. But that is really splitting hairs.
You guys really think, that Dunlop makes a 501 with "Harley-Davidson" molded on them for the factory, one with a different rubber mix for the dealers and again a different one (or two) for non-Harley applications? You're kidding, right? :? :?
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Postby Terry » Wed Mar 11, 2009 3:17 pm

Well I made no such statement. Maybe someone else did? My point is, the S11 is not at all as good as a 501 for cornering ability. It may last longer under normal riding conditions but I wouldn't want to go canyon dancing with one compared to a 501.
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Postby EMS » Wed Mar 11, 2009 4:01 pm

O.K., Misunderstanding. You were talking about different types of tires. But the claim was, the Dunlop on a new bike is not as good as the one you buy in the aftermarket.
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Postby Highmileage » Thu Mar 12, 2009 1:17 pm

It's been 25 years since I bought a new bike and I am not up on the tires that come with the latest new bikes.

But on that Honda V-four Sabre, the Dunlops that came with them were not ones that you'd have heard of - they were hard and handled like crud and lasted way too long.

I've seen this with many other bikes - I know that this is how it used to be, but it may or may not be how it still is. To get the OEM Dunlops, you would be better off going through the bike dealer's parts department. The manufacturer specifies the tires that they put on the new bikes.

But unless you were trying to keep it looking like it just came from the showroom, this would be stupid - the tires that most of us are familiar with are far superior to the OEM rubber.

Maybe the bike manufacturers finally realized that we've figured this out. As I said, I'm not sure what tires come on new bikes these days.

Harley has come a long way (tire-wise) since they made their deal with Dunlop. They tires are much improved over what they used to use, and they say 'Harley-Davidson' on the sidewall so the owner will go back to the dealer to buy replacement tires instead of buying generic Dunlops like we would.

I still don't understand the product loyalty that makes H-D riders want the company's logo on practically everything they own...

However, Buells come with Pirellis.
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Postby alimey4u2 » Thu Mar 12, 2009 7:51 pm

I remember the early daze, when you bought a Japanese bike the first thing you would do would be to dump the Bridgestones & put Brit rubber & shocks on.... :lol:
Then you had to put the engine in an Italian /Swiss/Brit/German chassis to handle... Now they all ride better than most street riders can ever hope to achieve... :wink:
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Postby Terry » Thu Mar 12, 2009 8:38 pm

Remember the Dunlop K81s? Used them on my CB750 and loved them!
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Postby Rick Pope » Thu Mar 12, 2009 8:59 pm

Ohhhh!!! You bring back memories. I had a K81 on the front of my CB750, and a Nankang 5.20x18 on the rear. Same tread pattern and as wide as would fit inside the swingarm. Side wall was about 8" tall.

Handling? All I wanted was the "look". Same as so many squids today.
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Postby Terry » Thu Mar 12, 2009 9:27 pm

I guess they handled well enough. I read somewhere years ago that a bike won the IOM TT shod with K81s. Needed tubes with them though due to the spoke wheels on the 750s.
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Postby alimey4u2 » Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:43 am

Yup first production bike to lap the IOM at over 100mph was shod with K81's, they later called them TT100's.... :wink:
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Postby EMS » Fri Mar 13, 2009 7:37 am

Terry wrote:Remember the Dunlop K81s? Used them on my CB750 and loved them!


I have one of those left. White lettering on the sidewalls. If you want it to decorate your garage, I can send it to you :wink:
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Postby Highmileage » Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:48 pm

Rick Pope wrote:Ohhhh!!! You bring back memories. I had a K81 on the front of my CB750...


I ran the K 81's on my Nortons back in the day, and they were okay for back then. But they were junk compared to what soon followed.

The tires that I really loved were the Michelin M-45's that I used on my early GS 750's - they were a real bitch to mount (ridiculously stiff sidewalls) but they were fantastic tires!
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Postby cbxtacy » Fri Mar 13, 2009 6:12 pm

still make the K81
http://www.dunlopmotorcycle.com/tirecat ... d=9#tire47
either that or Dunlop has a lot left over from the 70's :D
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